Top 10 publications in the last 5 years

1. Mapping the drivers of over-diagnosis to potential solutions.

Pathirana, T., Clark, J., Moynihan, R. 2017. BMJ, 358: j3879.

This review was based on a systematic search of the literature on the drivers of and solutions to overdiagnosis. It was undertaken as part of a wider plan to inform and develop Australia’s response to the challenge of overdiagnosis and related overuse. The mapping work developed a model of multi-layered drivers and solutions. It has been widely influential, informing both Australia’s response, and official policy on overdiagnosis of the World Organisation of Family Doctors.

2. Habit-based interventions for weight loss maintenance in adults with overweight and obesity: a randomized controlled trial

Cleo, G., Glasziou, P., Beller, E., Isenring, E., Thomas, R. 2018. International Journal of Obesity, 43: 374-383.

The majority of individuals who lose weight through diet and exercise, will regain the weight back. Conversely, habit-based interventions achieve successful, long-term, weight-loss maintenance. These novel outcomes caught worldwide media attention, featuring in 130+ media outlets, reaching over 7 million viewers and listed as Editors’ Choice for ‘The best of International Journal of Obesity 2018’.

3. Making progress with the automation of systematic reviews: principles of the International Collaboration for the Automation of Systematic Reviews (ICASR)

Beller, E., Clark, J., Tsafnat, G., et al. 2018. Systematic reviews, 7(1), 77.

This paper sets out the “Vienna Principles”, to guide and enable systematic review automation tools to be developed and integrated into toolkits to improve their interoperability and the efficiency of systematic reviews. The principles were written by an international group, the International Collaboration for the Automation of Systematic Reviews (ICASR) at its first meeting held in Vienna in October 2015. The group has continued to meet annually to discuss progress, and move forward from the principles to active collaboration.

4. Reducing antibiotic prescribing in Australian general practice: time for a national strategy

Del Mar, C. B., Scott, A. M., Glasziou, P. P., Hoffmann, T., van Driel, M. L., Beller, E., et al. MJA, 207(9), 401-406.

This recent paper overviews the importance of addressing the antibiotic resistance crisis by focussing on general practice and outlines strategies ad interventions that should be used to reduce antibiotic use in Australian general practice. It arose from discussions held at a national roundtable, attended by the Chief Medical Officers of Australia and the UK, that CREMARA hosted for researchers and key stakeholders (such as the Department of Health, Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in HealthCare, Therapeutic Guidelines, NPS MedicineWise, and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners).

5. Australia is responding to the complex challenge of overdiagnosis

Moynihan, R., Barratt, A. L., Buchbinder, R., et al. 2018. MJA, 209(8), 332-334.

This recent paper overviews the importance of addressing the antibiotic resistance crisis by focussing on general practice and outlines strategies ad interventions that should be used to reduce antibiotic use in Australian general practice. It arose from discussions held at a national roundtable, attended by the Chief Medical Officers of Australia and the UK, that CREMARA hosted for researchers and key stakeholders (such as the Department of Health, Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in HealthCare, Therapeutic Guidelines, NPS MedicineWise, and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners).

6. Reducing waste from incomplete or unusable reports of biomedical research

Glasziou, P., Altman, D. G., Bossuyt, P., et al. 2014. The Lancet, 383(9913), 267-276.

This recent paper overviews the importance of addressing the antibiotic resistance crisis by focussing on general practice and outlines strategies ad interventions that should be used to reduce antibiotic use in Australian general practice. It arose from discussions held at a national roundtable, attended by the Chief Medical Officers of Australia and the UK, that CREMARA hosted for researchers and key stakeholders (such as the Department of Health, Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in HealthCare, Therapeutic Guidelines, NPS MedicineWise, and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners).

7. Better reporting of interventions: Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist and guide

Hoffmann, T. C., Glasziou, P.P., Boutron, I., et al. 2014. BMJ, 348, g1687.

A new reporting statement (official extension to the CONSORT and SPIRIT statements) for reporting interventions; developed with 15 international experts, including editors of BMJ and PLOS Medicine. It has had >100,000 views, >1700 citations, been translated into 3 languages, incorporated into Cochrane’s systematic review guideline, the subject of editorials and analysis pieces in >25 international journals, and endorsed as a required reporting guideline by many journals, including the BMJ.

8. Clinicians' expectations of the benefits and harms of treatments, screening, and tests: a systematic review

Hoffmann, T. C., Del Mar, C. 2017. JAMA Intern Med, 177(3), 407-419.

Expectations about how much interventions can help or harm greatly influence care decisions. This landmark review found that clinicians rarely have accurate expectations and often overestimate intervention benefit and underestimate harm. It is the sister review to the 2015 systematic review of patients’ expectations (also published in JAMA Internal Medicine), which concluded that most patients overestimate intervention benefit and underestimate harm. The results of both reviews strongly support the need for shared decision making and evidence-informed discussion about an intervention’s possible benefits and harms. Both reviews are highly cited and had immense international and media attention (including an Altmetric score of 1960, which was the 103rd highest of all articles in the world published in 2017).

9. Guidance for Modifying the Definition of Diseases: A checklist

Doust, J., Vandvik, P.O., ..., Glasziou, P. 2017. JAMA Intern Med, 177(8); 1020-1025

This paper provides the first structured guidance for groups seeking to modify the definition of a disease.  Guideline committees frequently widen disease definitions, with inappropriate widening of these definitions recognised as causing harm to patients and driving unsustainable growth in healthcare budgets. This checklist and guidance, developed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts, is a crucial first step in facilitating more rigorous evaluation of changes to disease definitions prior to their implementation.

10. Shared decision making: what do clinicians need to know and why should they bother?

Hoffmann, T. C., Légaré, F., ... & Del Mar, C.B. 2014. MJA, 201(1), 35-39.

This paper was written after our institute initiated and hosted Australian’s inaugural shared decision making research symposium (in conjunction with NHMRC and the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare), which was attended by representatives from the co-hosting organisations, national and international researchers, consumer groups, private health insurers, NPS Medicine Wise, Choosing Wisely, and the New Zealand Health Quality and Safety Commission. It also led to the writing of Australia's first statement on shared decision making by the NHMRC. This MJA paper was a call to arms. This MJA paper was published in the Centennial issue of MJA as the ‘future of healthcare’, was the 6th most downloaded MJA paper in its year of publication, and has >150 citations.